Men’s

Miharayasuhiro Spring 2015 Menswear

· Men's, Runway · , , , , , , ,

Did we mention that nostalgia has been dictating a lot of designers’ collections this season? For Mihara Yasuhiro, that couldn’t have been more clear. After the recent death of Bryan McMahon, the British stylist who served as a mentor to Yasuhiro, the designer paid homage to his old friend. A mashup of the pair’s longtime collaboration was presented with the help of editors Kim Howells and Luke Day, two of the closest people to McMahon, and the end result was a story teeming with life experience, worn by years of hard work.

To many, this story could have been translated to that of a California surfer dude; with sandals, fedora hats, beaded necklaces, prints, and jeans, it would seem like just another laid back look for the spring/summer season. However, Mihara Yasuhiro’s reminiscence was the true display. Distressed layers revealed tattered, worn out fabrics below, while denim was slashed and frayed to suggest the wear of life’s trials and tribulations. Tie-dyed knits with loosened threads furthered this dissertation, while a somber piano tune dominated the show. In a nod to McMahon’s own idiosyncrasies, leopard and paisley patterns made a surprisingly cute couple, adding an upbeat spin to the rugged Miharayasuhiro man.

Mihara Yasuhiro noted, “I come from the country of the kimono and the original street style…Bryan brought classic tailoring and elegance to the brand.” This mélange of different aesthetics was evident, and instead of being dominated by sorrow, the spring 2015 Miharayasuhiro menswear collection was a beautiful thank you note to the influence and inspiration brought by Bryan McMahon.

See a few shots from the Miharayasuhiro spring 2015 menswear collection below, and scroll down to see the collection in its entirety!

All photos in this gallery by Scott Shapiro

All photos in this gallery by Marcus Tondo/indigitalimages.com

wooyoungmi

Wooyoungmi Spring 2015 Menswear

· Men's, Runway · , , , , , , , ,

wooyoungmi

“Chillax,” is how Katie Chung described the vibe for the spring 2015 Wooyoungmi menswear collection. After years of involvement, the 28-year-old Central Saint Martins graduate has recently been named joint creative director of her mother’s brand. The end result was a much looser silhouette than before. Not only does a solid design aesthetic run in the family, but it also seems like opposites attract; Woo Young Mi’s sharp lines and strict shapes were given a jolt of youthful vitality thanks to Chung’s first official collaboration.

The show notes mentioned the Wooyoungmi man’s resistance to nine-to-five sartorial constraints, with ideas of an artsier inclination being tossed around. Collages of texture and bonded fabrics clarified this concept, which further came to fruition via prints inspired by the work of Carlos Cruz-Diez and Roy Lichtenstein. These motifs were reflected on sheer mesh panels, adding a sporty slant to the ensembles when paired with loose drawstring chinos or when highlighted by a shirt tied at the waist.

The quietly lively Miami color palette could serve as another reminder of the youthful changes at Wooyoungmi. Simple black, white, and grey was spruced up with pops of peaceful light blue and optimistic yellow. If you still weren’t convinced about the loosened up attitude of the Wooyoungmi man, just take a look at the modernized crocs, sure to be top items of the spring 2015 menswear season. And if that didn’t do it for you, the laid-back trap sounds at the show would surely be a selling point.

See the Wooyoungmi spring 2015 menswear collection in its entirety below!

All photos in this gallery by Marcus Tondo/indigitalimages.com

Feature photo by Scott Shapiro

Givenchy Spring 2015 Menswear

· Men's, Runway · , , , , , , ,

Paris Fashion Week has been full of milestones and nostalgia, as designers have been looking into their own lives to create their spring 2015 menswear collections. In Riccardo Tisci’s case, the designer of the moment pregamed his upcoming 40th birthday with a return to his aesthetic roots.

It’s no secret that Tisci has long been inspired by his Catholic upbringing, shown here through precise tailoring and monochromatic palettes. The rigid combination of a white shirt, black jacket, and black tie was given a schoolboy twist via shorts and sneakers. Said sneakers added the sportswear influence that Tisci played a key role in popularizing, with select pairs extending all the way up the models’ thighs. Though substantially subdued in comparison to past seasons, the urban vibes were solidified with sheer black skullcaps topping off every look. Masculinity was far more prominent than elsewhere in Paris, while a few female counterparts – Adriana Lima, Candice Swanepoel, Saskia de Brauw, Isabeli Fontana, and more – evoked the necessary dose of dark sensuality that Riccardo loves.

Surprisingly enough, there were none of the uber-popular printed tees that we’d expect from a Givenchy menswear collection. However, don’t think that Tisci completely ditched prints altogether. Instead of Rottweilers, Madonnas, or Bambi’s, the designer turned to gypsophila, more commonly known as baby’s breath. The floral motif blossomed throughout the show, appearing in both black and white, growing more abstract to the point of minimalist camouflage, and ultimately transforming into pearl studded embellishments. The intricate, couture-quality embroidery added a feminine slant to the otherwise macho display, and it looked exceptional atop sheer layers and structured bomber jackets.

Sometimes it’s best to simply go back to basics; Riccardo Tisci’s spring 2015 menswear collection was his most simple endeavor in recent seasons, and it couldn’t have been better.

See a few shots from the Givenchy spring 2015 menswear collection below, and scroll down to see the collection in its entirety!

 

All photos in this gallery by Scott Shapiro

All photos in this gallery by Monica Feudi / Feudiguaineri.com

Feature photo by Boutayna Fartale

Kris Van Assche Spring 2015 Menswear

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“This is not a retrospective show at all,” Kris Van Assche urged. Aside from his work as the creative director at Dior Homme, the Belgian designer’s spring 2015 menswear range marked his tenth year and twentieth collection for his eponymous label. But instead of looking back on what’s been done so far, KVA decided to put a new twist on his own signatures.

The sharp silhouette that Kris Van Assche is known for was given a new dynamic through different forms of experimentation approached with a bold sense of confidence. Knitwear was thinned out to the farthest extent, providing a useful element of diaphaneity; the designer added a twist to his signatures by layering unexpected bomber jackets over fine-tailored, double-breasted blazers. Meanwhile, the obligatory skinny tie was tucked into kangaroo-like pockets on several shirts, vanishing halfway down. Blue and white tweed resembled distressed denim, while strips of the actual fabric were used as belts. Grey check pieces sang a relatively grungy tune when compared to the sky blue and salmon colors in the collection. But in bright orange, a similar pattern felt a bit more punk. And when combined with slits at the knees of several trousers and beaded, surfer-style bracelets and necklaces, these looks made way for a more rebellious Kris Van Assche man.

However, this rebellious streak was done subtly, thanks to the necessary dose of luxury and quality that Van Assche is known for. The overall image projected a sense of endearment, taking a fresh new look at the world, ready to conquer it. Perhaps this is how Kris Van Assche viewed this exciting new chapter in his life; the designer’s mantra implies that a man’s clothing is an expression of his personality. After a decade of his own namesake line, who could blame him for exploring new territories?

See the Kris Van Assche spring 2015 menswear collection in its entirety below!

All photos in this gallery by Yannis Viamos/indigitalimages.com

Photo by Boutayna Fartale

Feature photos by Scott Shapiro

Issey Miyake Spring 2015 Menswear

· Men's, Runway · , , , , , , ,

What do you get when you combine exotic resorts with the lush landscape of Palau as sources of inspiration? For Yusuke Takahashi, the end result was his spring 2015 collection for Issey Miyake menswear, titled “Tropical Dandies.”

With pushed back hair and megawatt smiles, models happily pranced down the long white runway, evoking the scene of a boardwalk reaching towards the Pacific Ocean. It was exactly the image Takahashi intended to project, providing the perfect pick-me-up on an already bright and sunny Parisian morning. Pumping music, vibrant colors, and powerful struts took us back to some of the most fun days of fashion in the 1990s. Good vibes were aplenty, but the clothes themselves were far more conceptual than meets the eye; would you expect anything less from the always innovative Issey Miyake brand?

Yusuke Takahashi’s collection took us on a journey from a verdant jungle to white sand beaches, extending all the way into the deep sea. The first segment was presented through unique materials. Woven from wild banana, abaca was combined with pineapple via linen and nylon to create sharp tweed jackets. Though the show notes described the silhouette as urban, the materials yielded a light feeling that was perfect for the resort that Takahashi dreamed of.

Things got a little more urban as we made our way to the beach thanks to a spectrum of sneakers that contributed to a sportier, dynamic style. There were garments in shades of ivory like the purest of sand alongside items printed with multicolored jellyfish motifs, while iridescent pieces resembled light on water. The reflections of the sea didn’t stop there, either. In a series of suits, shirts, ponchos, and scarves, four different shades of blue were pleated in classic Issey Miyake fashion to create pale gradient stripes.

Moving further into the deep, the “Abyss” series closed off Yusuke Takahashi’s spring 2015 show. And the depth didn’t just apply to the physical quality of the ocean; these pieces came with a profound message, done in collaboration with BLOOM Association, an NGO dedicated to marine conservation. An homage to the beauty of deep sea fauna and an urgent reminder of our responsibility to protect it, images of aquatic creatures were digitally reproduced onto garments with enhanced colors and vibrant patterns.

Not that we would expect anything but impressive work from Mr. Takahashi, it seems like each season opens a new dimension to his multifaceted design aesthetic. The message of consciousness for our environment prominently stood out, bolstered by a fun, vibrant, uplifting, and energetic collection. What more could you want from a fashion show?

See a few shots from the Issey Miyake spring 2015 menswear collection below, and scroll down to see the collection in its entirety!

All photos in this gallery by Scott Shapiro

All photos in this gallery by Marcus Tondo/indigitalimages.com

Photo by Branko Popovic

Raf Simons Spring 2015 Menswear

· Men's, Runway · , , , , , , ,
Photo by Branko Popovic

Photo by Branko Popovic

“…The use of flash photography will not be permitted on cameras or phones due to special lighting,” a voice announced to the all-standing audience at Raf Simons’ spring 2015 menswear show. What was to unfold after was a thrilling, astonishing experience unlike any other.

The lighting that the announcement referred to was the stuff of nightmares, or rather that of a 1970s horror film. Green lights, symbolizing nature, were juxtaposed with a hellish red, appropriately meant to indicate danger. While the deep, psychoanalytical symbols were just getting started there, the end result was an ambiance akin to that of the climax scene in Carrie. Luckily, there was no blood or fire, and the models didn’t demolish the crowd at the Place Vendôme show space. But the eery undertones were furthered by the chilling music. Many people heard notes of Twin Peaks, though it was actually Mica Levi’s sounds for Under the Skin that played, to which the models paced around the maze-like runway in a repetitive loop of panic and power. With their moistened faces, wide eyes peering beneath loose strands of scraggly hair, Raf Simons’ boys were like a fashion army of Carrie Whites. Perhaps all of these observations would have changed if the audience had been seated; according to Simons, “you perceive things differently when you’re upright.” Did we mention the psychological undertones?

Surprisingly, the clothes themselves took on a completely different meaning. Sure, the thrilling images of Jaws and terrified swimmers fit the atmosphere, some of the many parts of the collages that garnished sailor collars on the backs of coats. Alongside photos of a lonely astronaut and a roller coaster, ideas of fear, danger, isolation, and more were evoked, while everything had a significance in Simons’ own personal history. Like a mood board attached to clothing, Raf’s pieces weren’t entirely about horror after all. Instead, nostalgia seemed to be the overarching element.

An old passport photo of himself in a Superman t-shirt, pictures of his parents, and moments with friends were just a few other motifs that helped delineate Simons’ self-exploration. Personal, indeed. Slightly leaning towards the professional side, a snapshot of koi fish and a painting of Mount Fuji by Hokusai served as metaphoric thank-you letters to some of Simons’ earliest supporters, further emphasized by Japanese-inspired printed knit tops.

So, what does it all mean? How did Simons’ stream of consciousness correlate with an identical environment to that infamous prom scene? Maybe we’re overanalyzing it; from a strictly sartorial standpoint, there were plenty of pieces that one could argue were just fashion, nothing more. Relatively eccentric prints were shielded by minimal, solid-colored coats. Simple button-down shirts with appropriately fitted trousers created a clean silhouette, paired with a spectrum of sneakers, many of which lit up with the models’ every steps. Yes, those same light-up kicks from early childhood have made a comeback, and there’s no doubt that they’re going to sell like wildfire. But is there symbolism in that? Could it be a continuation of the nostalgia?

It’s the type of show that could make you cry. No, not because the menacing lights and spooky sounds made it seem like the models would lock you in and take you down. Conversely, it was the type of thing that reminds you what there is to love about fashion. The psychology, the thoughtfulness, the history, and the emotion. Whatever it means, whether we’re completely misinterpreting it or not, Raf Simons’ spring 2015 menswear show was a psychology lesson at its finest. The designer took a deeper look into his own mind, making us do the same.

See a few shots from the Raf Simons spring 2015 menswear collection below, and scroll down to see the collection in its entirety!

All photos in this gallery by Scott Shapiro

All photos in this gallery by Yannis Viamos/indigitalimages.com

Photo by Boutayna Fartale

Photo Courtesy Firstview.com

Walter Van Beirendonck Spring 2015 Menswear

· Men's, Runway · , , , , , ,
Photo Courtesy Firstview.com

Photo Courtesy Firstview.com

“Stop Racism,” pieces at Walter Van Beirendonck urged in the designer’s last menswear collection. But the war didn’t end after last season.

For spring 2015, WVB took on a new battle: the invasion of privacy. Show notes garnished with CCTV footage were a clear indicator of that concept, but of course, the clothes took on a more subliminal role. The militant style was less obvious than the felt helmets featured in the designer’s preceding endeavor, though brocade-style jackets certainly carried the theme. Don’t think that these jackets were anything like those of the typical menswear breed; this is Walter Van Beirendonck, after all. Instead, wildly printed outerwear was embellished with strips and bits of fabric in a collage-like fashion, with many noting the appearance of shields (protecting the men from Big Brother, of course).

WVB’s battle continued through the random assortment of mismatched concepts on one single garment. Whether an image of a shark or a gun, a cat or an orange, the designer’s goal was to throw off the all-seeing eye of CCTV, while the images could only have as much meaning as viewers would give them. Quite a statement on how we perceive fashion, isn’t it? Surveillance cameras’ confusion was further illustrated through the divided faces that appeared on models towards the end of the show. One side monochrome, the other in vivid colors and prints, WVB created a new form of the “dazzle camouflage” used by WWII warships.

Between the lively palette and the uplifting soundtrack, Walter Van Beirendonck’s spring 2015 menswear show would never seem to carry such a deep, provocative message to the naked eye. But look further, and the inner workings of WVB’s aesthetic is always about redefining men’s fashion in a thoughtful, substantial way. Whether intolerance or invasion of privacy, this designer will never go down without a fight.

Thank you to Walter Van Beirendonck for keeping us on our toes, keeping our gears turning, and always keeping fashion interesting by never compromising a true vision.

See a few shots from the Walter Van Beirendonck spring 2015 menswear collection below, and scroll down to see the collection in its entirety!

All photos in this gallery by Scott Shapiro

All photos in this gallery by Yannis Viamos/indigitalimages.com

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Adidas, Raf, Rick, and Another Round

· Men's, News, Top Items · , , , , ,

 

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Yes, you read the title correctly. Adidas is once again pairing up with both Raf Simons and Rick Owens for fall 2014 after insanely successful collaborations with both designers.

In case you forgot, Raf Simons’ shoe game was on point this year with seven to-die-for, multicolored, fantastic men’s kicks for Adidas Originals and Adidas Performance. And let’s not forget about the sick sneaks he recently sent down the runway at his Dior womenswear shows. This time around, homeboy plans to revamp his magnificent pieces with new colors and materials, including a variation on the classic Stan Smith with perforated “R” details. Side note: though that obviously stands for Raf, how much do you want to bet Rihanna will get into these come fall? Oh, and let’s not forget about the outdoor boots. The Bunny Bounce and Bunny Riding Star may sound a little ridiculous, but they’re seriously cool, for real. They could be neon orange, if you want, or they could be black, white, or burgundy. We may be sweating literally right now, but once the frigid winter rolls around, we’ll be thanking Mr. Simons for this stylish snow gear.

On Rick Owens’ side, the designer developed the Tech Runner, a simpler version of the shoes from his past Adidas collaboration. Owens mentions being inspired by Stealth Bombers – because why wouldn’t he be drawn to something so intense? – for their minimalistic structure. The shoes are alike, sleek and simple yet modern and striking. Adidas’ iconic stripes and Owens’ A-list signature adorn the full-length soles of the Tech Runners. Rick Owens’ last Adidas mashup was incredibly popular despite the shoes’ atypical appearance, so there’s no doubt that his fall 2014 line will be any different.

For all of the sneaker-heads and luxury lovers, the Adidas by Raf Simons will retail from $455-$1,280, while the Adidas by Rick Owens styles will come in at $790. Both collections will be available starting in mid-July. No, we can’t wait either.

Check out Raf Simons and Rick Owens’ upcoming Adidas sneakers below!

Adidas by Raf Simons "Bounce"

Adidas by Raf Simons “Bounce”

Adidas by Raf Simons "Bounce"

Adidas by Raf Simons “Bounce”

Adidas by Raf Simons "Bunny Rising Star"

Adidas by Raf Simons “Bunny Rising Star”

Adidas by Raf Simons "Bunny Rising Star"

Adidas by Raf Simons “Bunny Rising Star”

Adidas by Raf Simons "Response Trial 2"

Adidas by Raf Simons “Response Trial 2”

Adidas by Raf Simons "Rising Star 2"

Adidas by Raf Simons “Rising Star 2”

Adidas by Raf Simons "Stan Smith"

Adidas by Raf Simons “Stan Smith”

Adidas by Raf Simons "Stan Smith"

Adidas by Raf Simons “Stan Smith”

Adidas by Raf Simons "Bunny Bounce"

Adidas by Raf Simons “Bunny Bounce”

Adidas by Raf Simons "Bunny Bounce"

Adidas by Raf Simons “Bunny Bounce”

Adidas by Raf Simons "Bunny Rising Star"

Adidas by Raf Simons “Bunny Rising Star”

Adidas by Raf Simons "Rising Star 2"

Adidas by Raf Simons “Rising Star 2”

Adidas by Rick Owens "Tech Runner"

Adidas by Rick Owens “Tech Runner”

Adidas by Rick Owens "Tech Runner"

Adidas by Rick Owens “Tech Runner”

Adidas by Rick Owens "Tech Runner"

Adidas by Rick Owens “Tech Runner”

Adidas by Rick Owens "Tech Runner"

Adidas by Rick Owens “Tech Runner”

All photos courtesy Adidas

Photo Courtesy Nowfashion

LCM, That’s a Wrap!

· Men's, Runway · , , , , ,
Photo Courtesy Nowfashion

Photo Courtesy NowFashion

After noteworthy presentations from day one and two of London Collections: Men, the third and final day served as the perfect close to the first round of the spring/summer 2015 menswear shows.

E. Tautz started off the day with lots of stripes, whether vertical or horizontal, skinny or wide. Designer Patrick Grant’s range predominantly came in the limited – but not limiting – palette of navy, white, blue, and beige, shown on oversized, loosely tailored silhouettes. It was the denim pieces that truly stole the show, like the classic jean jacket paired with prim pinstripes, or the wide-leg shorts worn with a blue and white distorted floral print t-shirt and sandal/sneaker hybrid shoes. Said shoes are essentially perfect, combining everyone’s sporty obsession with seasonably appropriate ventilation (though this isn’t the first time things like this have appeared). And they went exceptionally well with a dark wash denim parka and loose navy shorts with wide vertical white stripes.

How could London Collections: Men come to a close without a little more over-the-top fashion? That’s where Cozette McCreery, Joe Bates, and Sid Bryan came in with their spring/summer 2015 menswear collection for Sibling. Printed denim, neon orange, and loads of hairlike fringe showed up in the first few looks, while lace tops and skirts, cartoonish skull print tees, and Flintstone bone necklaces subsequently followed. The show closed with the most absurd bright red pom-pom ensembles imaginable, which appeared to be made out of shredded knit. The outfits engulfed the models’ faces as they presumably struggled to navigate the runway…casual.

Let’s hope the runways were clean, as Craig Green sent models down completely barefoot. Loose trousers with drawstrings gone wild, crazy cutouts on comparatively tight tops, and massive attachments on the backs of a series of models helped illustrate Green’s complex vision that evoked an extra dose of Eastern inspiration. Faux-Japanese elements were meshed with the Wild West over at Katie Eary, where lanterns and cacti coincided on sunset-hued printed silk shirts. There was an undeniable sense of 1960s or 70s hippie style, too, translated through solarized aviators, knitted polos, and psychedelic separates in blaring brights. Not quite as bright, Nasir Mazhar‘s collection was certainly bold. The sportiest styles outside of the gym, whites on whites and jewel toned prints appeared on luxe fabrics, and there was a whole lot of skin.

We saw some identical looks to those at DKNY at Joseph, particularly a jersey-style top under a blue suit, but the rest of the collection stood perfectly on its own. Supple leather bottoms looked spectacular with stylish sandals and striped tops, while floral print pants were toned down by their navy and black counterparts. And let’s not forget about the loud pops of orange; the unexpected color made a pleasant surprise in the form of bomber jackets and trousers.

We can’t deny that London would be nothing without Burberry Prorsum. The essentially British label is always the highlight of every London Fashion Week, and this time, Christopher Bailey took his ultimately English vision to some type of fantasy land. The Kensington Gardens tent was teeming with sunlight as the models hid beneath floppy bucket hats. Bailey was inspired by the travel writer Bruce Chatwin, garnering a vibrant, multicolored scope for spring 2015 menswear. There was suede and soft leather, with pieces in virtually every color of the rainbow and tailoring in both sleek and loose silhouettes. It seems like Christopher Bailey is catching up with just about every other designer, too, putting a range of sneakers on the runway this season, many in hues just as vibrant as the outfits they were paired with. And although the thought of layering might make us cringe in our current summer climate, those denim jackets couldn’t have looked any better than they did while tucked under voluminous trench coats. Just when you thought Christopher Bailey couldn’t possibly find another dimension to his Burberry aesthetic, he somehow outdoes himself.

So that’s a wrap! London Collections: Men has produced some amazing things from new talents and old favorites, proving a promising future for the fashion capital’s menswear scene. Now it’s off to Milan! After a few days of downtime, the spring/summer 2015 menswear shows will continue in Italy’s undisputed fashion capital on June 21, and there’s tons of exciting things to anticipate. Stay tuned!

Check out some of the most noteworthy looks from the third and final day of LCM below, and be sure to click through the above links for full collections. And stay tuned for more coverage of the spring/summer 2015 menswear shows!

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More From LCM

· Men's, Runway · , , , , ,

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In just one day of the spring/summer 2015 menswear shows, we’ve seen everything from sleek minimalism to military-inspired garb to even a few men’s crop tops. And as London Collections: Men continued, there was plenty more to be seen.

J.W. Anderson stuck to his typically atypical aesthetic, featuring peacefully printed sleeveless knit tops and stripes in every direction. No stranger to blurring the lines of traditional gender dressing, Mr. Anderson also threw in some off the shoulder shirts, complete with side-tied details for good measure. Cropped, low-neck sweaters were balanced out with comparatively conservative polos, while a series of jersey-like shirts came in surprisingly simple yet lavishly lush colors.

Keeping things out of the ordinary, KTZ showed an Olympian man for the modern age. Urban sportswear with gladiator-esque sandals and Greco-Roman accessories and prints – predominantly in black and white – were made relevant via mesh and tech fabrics. Meanwhile, Margaret Howell stuck to her go-to anti-fashion framework; the designer always mentions that her clothes are intended to be simply wearable, not all about fashion. Regardless, classic staples like cuffed chinos and simple suits were brought to life on boxy, masculine silhouettes, while details such as tinted shades and boy scout ascots added a necessary extra dose of character.

Richard James played with the quickly emerging military trend by adding pops of pinks and blues to the otherwise stoic ensembles. Christopher Kane showed arguably the best collection of the day, featuring wild stripes like those at J.W. Anderson along sides electric, neon yellows. And there was no shortage of sharply tailored suits or multicolored printed tees, many of which featured sheer sleeves. Though Kane is often noted for going very far out of the box with his womenswear, his menswear has often been considered a much safer endeavor. Sure, his latest line would seem traditional when put next to the dresses reminiscent of garbage bags from his fall 2014 womenswear collection, but it’s exciting to see more of the vibrant experimentation that the designer is known and loved for being spread evenly amongst both sexes.

Alexander McQueen is always one of the most anticipated shows during London’s menswear presentations, and Sarah Burton definitely didn’t fail to deliver this season. Yes, there were some red prints atop black garments, though when mixed with a fresh dose of white, the overall looks seemed far less harsh than the gothic image of last season. In fact, all-white outfits with touches of bright blues and yellow-greens were far from what we’d expect from the usually dark designer. Talk about refreshing for spring.

Over at James Long, the sporty and psychedelic themes from yesterday’s shows were somehow cohesively meshed together, telling the story of a Thai boxer who gave up the aggressive activity to become a hippie. Certainly a creative concept, Long translated this into deconstructed boxing ribbons reassembled and scattered upon denim jackets, while laid back sportiness was embodied on the Baja-inspired hoodies that made an appearance. And at Pringle of Scotland, polos were updated in tech fabric, while shades of blues – from navy to cobalt – made for perfect pairs with pops of green. And we can’t forget the few vibrant oranges that showed up, either.

The talk of the town was definitely Moschino, though. It was Jeremy Scott’s first menswear collection for the label, which also showed in London for the first time. But the literal rainbow of logomania wasn’t a first in the slightest; if Scott’s kitschy line from his fall 2014 womenswear collection wasn’t enough, there was plenty more to be seen at menswear. Yes, brand logos were reinterpreted onto outfits in the most ridiculous ways possible, all of which will probably sell exceptionally well (why else would Jeremy Scott continue this madness?). Whether the cheesy smiley faces aligned to imitate the Chanel logo, the spin on the Hermès ribbons, or even the questionably self-deprecating “Fauxschino” prints, there was an unbelievable abundance of ridiculousness. Underneath it all, you could see a sense of sportswear, tied into sneakers and hoodies, while sleek suits were the primary candidates for Scott’s parody logo obsession. While the overall collection could be seen as try-hard, pretentious, gimmicky, attention-thirsty, and the like, you really can’t deny that Jeremy Scott knows what he’s doing (even as much as you’d probably like to). But even if the actual collection was completely removed, the perfectly diverse cast – including the slew of female models thrown into the mix – was an extra surge of positivity that every fashion show could use. Regardless of how you feel about Jeremy Scott’s designs at Moschino, it’s impossible to hate on whoever’s doing this casting the right way.

Check out some of the most noteworthy looks from day two of LCM below, and be sure to click through the above links for full collections. And stay tuned for more coverage of the spring/summer 2015 menswear shows!