Thoughts

Laurence Philomene 3

THE ESCAPISTS: LAURENCE PHILOMENE

· Beyond, Thoughts · , , , ,

By Lara Arbid

There’s something about the color pink. Pop, creamy neutral, fuschia, baby pink. It’s bold and energetic yet calming, but also delivers a sense of happiness that’s hard to explain. It seems to be everywhere nowadays, and it’s what’s most appealing about Laurence Philomene’s work. Laurence is a photographer, curator and director based in Montreal. Her work is a representation of self-exploration of identity, but most importantly, creating what feels most natural to her as an artist.

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If you’re familiar with Japanese Blythe dolls, that’s a start in understanding the development of Laurence’s aesthetic. At an early age she began collecting these dolls, posting their photos on Flickr to a growing community of collectors online. It was the freedom of playing with positions and poses of the dolls that yielded an attractive aesthetic for her. From then on, photography became an escape in high school. Laurence took photos of herself, of her friends, and moved on to study photography in college.

There’s a lasting power in beautiful images. A photo presents a moment in time that is a snapshot of the artist’s world through his or her lens. For Laurence, photography was very much an escape from reality in her early days. She began placing her inner world within the real world through her work. Over time Laurence managed to turn this fantasy world into real life with what she calls “a little universe that I’ve created for myself.” She was motivated to create dreamy scenarios as a way of escaping the dull world of high school. In contrast, Laurence feels her work now showcases a fantasy bubble she lives in, and less about creating a fake scenario. Her surroundings have changed, as has her motivation to create. Everyone around her is open-minded, queer and accepting, allowing her work to become a personal and safe space.

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What’s most valuable about Laurence’s work is her apparent honesty. Her aesthetic is extremely cohesive, and though it seems like there’s a continuous narrative, Laurence explains she’s never been good at telling stories. “They’re overwhelming to me,” she says. It shows me another dimension of her honesty as an artist when she explains she’s not good at making up stories either. For Laurence, it’s about showing what’s there and the beauty of it.

There’s certainly a link between all of her photos: her use of color and very simple composition. Laurence doesn’t have any rules or patterns, but simply creates what’s appealing to her visually. Her minimal approach is what presents such memorable imagery. “It’s my camera, myself and that’s it.”

For a long time, Laurence’s work was less about telling stories but largely about herself. Her past work projected her feelings on gender and identity. She explored this through a great deal of self-portraits, becoming obsessed with the idea of looking at herself. Fascinatingly, this transitioned into a series called Me versus Others, where she began to dress people as herself and photographed them. The motivation behind this series was to deal with this discomfort of photographing her body. “At first I felt uncomfortable, but I wanted to continue to take self-portraits. This felt like a way around it by using other peoples bodies,” Laurence explains. Through time it started to shift and become more about examining what objects and themes she associated with her identity. She also expresses that she has created a character of this false version of herself through this series. One powerful image from this series captures a Cheeto orange-haired figure against a millennial pink background. The fuzzy wrap adds textural play that is representative of Laurence’s style, and a coherent feature in her work.

Laurence’s work transitioned into collaborations with people who vocalized how they want to be represented. This was an interesting shift that started to tie in many of the themes explored in Laurence’s work, such as gender, identity, softness, friendship, and intimacy. When her subjects were asked how they wanted to be represented, some would dive deep into a fantasy self, wishing to be presented as a pop star for example. Others, in contrast, stayed grounded in their reality. Her work as a young artist brings value to relationships and strengthening communities. Laurence shows us the worth of presenting intimacy and communicating friendship in photos, while also pushing individuals to dream and self-build.

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Philomene calls herself lucky in the art community. She’s created friendships in a community of artists who share the same artistic goals and intentions; Laurence credits her friends as her main source of inspiration.

As a photographer, she hopes to provide others with a sense of comfort through her work. To her, what’s most important is to provide a sense of belonging, like photography has given her. When asked what she hopes to get out of her work, she declared staying inspired and providing for those she loves at the top of her list. There is a definite long-lasting impact to Laurence’s work and personality as a creative. Laurence shows us that for this generation and beyond, it is imperative to be creative, ambitious, and a dreamer.

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All photos by Laurence Philomene

To read the full story, get your copy of Phosphenes 3 – “Fantasy”

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THE AGE OF AQUARIA

· Beyond, Thoughts · , , ,

by Israel Mejia

Aquaria smells like an alien. I quietly ask her what perfume she’s wearing, as we sit across from each other having dinner one cold March evening in the Lower East Side. It was surprisingly packed for a weeknight at Russ & Daughter’s. The question seemed to throw her off, only for the fact that she had just finished going on a rant about an Instagram homebody who had recently accused her of copying her housewife look. After a quizzical look, she answers that it’s her favorite scent, the ever so popular “Alien” by Thierry Mugler. It makes sense that she would wear a perfume that almost perfectly seems to define who she is: different.

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SHOT

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by Scott Shapiro | Edited by Deborah Hussey

All photographs by Kathy Shorr

The subject of guns is one of America’s most polarizing issues. Photographer Kathy Shorr examines this complex topic, sharing the diverse, authentic stories of survivors of gun violence in order to spark an open discussion.

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BLACK LIVES MATTER

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It seems that almost every day, Black Americans are killed at the hands of the police. Why must our citizens walk down their own streets in fear of the people meant to protect them, simply because they exist?

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The Ongoing Battle

· Runway, Thoughts · , , , , , , ,

Diversity in fashion seems like one of the industry’s longest running battles; it feels like every season, we discuss how much progress has been made and how much more we need to see. For the spring 2017 shows in New York, London, Milan, and Paris, this season proved to be the most diverse yet. But let’s not get too excited just yet. There’s still quite a lot of progress to be made.

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Maria Borges and Ajak Deng photographed by Ed Singleton and styled by Solange Franklin for Models.com: "Africa Rising"

The Big Break

· The Come-Up, Thoughts, Travel & Culture · , , , ,

While many were upset by Valentino’s questionable attempt at a tribute to Africa, we can wonder how the intended “cultural exchange” would look if carried out by authentic African designers; there’s no denying the fact that coverage of the continent’s fashion scene has been pretty minimal. Well things are changing, as the global fashion map is broadening more and more each day.

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Doing it All Wrong

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You may remember the somewhat problematic spring 2016 ready-to-wear show that Valentino staged. Drawing inspiration from Africa, designers Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli stated that “the message is tolerance. And the beauty that comes out of cross-cultural expression.” Unfortunately, that got lost in translation, as things got kind of screwed up when it all came to fruition; out of about 90 looks, only 10 were featured on black models, while everyone (including all of the nonblack models) got cornrow hairstyles. If you need more clarification as to why this is an issue, Africa is predominantly made up of black people, and cornrows are a traditionally black hairstyle. So if the team at Valentino wanted to represent Africa, they should’ve at least tried to show their collection on people slightly reminiscent of the majority of those in Africa.

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Starman Forever

· Inspiration, Thoughts · , , , ,

There’s no denying the massive impact of the legend that is David Bowie, transcending beyond rock superstardom to influence art, culture, film, and fashion. Serving as an endless source of inspiration, the master of reinvention captivated the world from his breakout Space Oddity. From there, he instilled an appreciation for androgyny, noted for his eccentric, glam, otherworldly presence during the Ziggy Stardust era. His creative edge continued throughout the entirety of his career, bringing the unusual to the mainstream. We could write a dissertation on the immeasurable effect David Bowie has had on us, as well as countless others over time, whether through image or sound or aesthetic or attitude. But instead, we can simply show our gratitude. Thank you, Mr. Bowie, for showing the importance of individuality and the power of unconventionality. But most importantly, thank you for not just keeping your head in the clouds, rather amongst the stars. Rest in space.

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2015: The Year in Review

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Time really flies; it’s hard to believe that 2015 is already coming to a close. And while it sort of feels like everything happened too fast to even process anything, there’s no denying a few major moments that went down in the world of fashion and beyond. The events themselves – from designer switch-ups and new faces to music and celebrity moments – may have been less than monumental. However, the conversations started on topics like gender identity, age, race, and the pace of the industry provided us with a framework of consciousness to be carried into 2016. Unless there’s another groundbreaking moment within the final week of 2015, it’s safe to bring this one to a close.

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Photo Courtesy Mark Leibowitz/Masterfile

Burnout

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